Airtrack Far East Pte. Ltd.

Fume Scrubber and Fan System that will soak up all the foul air from your workplace

 We Move and Purify Air


After determining the particular adsorbent necessary to control the emissions, an applicable adsorber system can be selected. Two major categories of adsorbers that are presently manufactured for industrial and commercial use are air purification devices (nonregenerative) and solvent recovery devices (regenerative).


Air purification applications are effective where the pollutants are emitted at very low concentrations (below 100 ppm) but need to be controlled because of their highly malodorous or toxic nature. These systems are cost-effective only at low concentrations because of their nonregenerative design. In solvent recovery applications, activated carbon may be used to economically recover and reclaim solvents from process exhaust streams at concentrations in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm. Activated-carbon regenerative systems, whether for pollution control or solvent recovery, are designated as carbon-resorb systems. The air pollution control device of the volatile organic compound to be controlled.


The basic function of control devices applicable in the low-concentration range is to purify both recirculated indoor air and ventilation air brought in from outdoors so that it will be odorless and safe for breathing.The control devices used for this purpose are designated as air purification systems. Air purification is generally carried out in a partially closed system; that is, the carbon-purified air is recirculated into the occupied spaces for reuse by the occupants. There are several configurations of air purification devices, such as radial flow canisters, panels, and pleated carbon beds; all are designed to treat contaminated air in low concentrations.


To attain the most effective and economical service from air purification systems utilizing carbon adsorbent, various parameters need to be optimized. These parameters are flow, velocity, carbon mesh size, and bed thickness. They determine the resistance to flow, the adsorptive capacity, and the carbon bed area. Another important factor is the determination of the optimum service time at which the carbon bed should replaced. Pollutant concentration is also an important factor that should be recognized, because of its effect on capacity and service time.





Dry Activated Carbon Adsorption


Adsorption is a process wherein molecules of a fluid or gas contact and adhere to the surface of a solid. This phenomenon is believed to occur generally in nature, regardless of the particular solids and gases involved. The forces present in this intermolecular activity have been identified as being of two major types: van der Waals forces and chemical or ionic forces. The bonding force playing the major role in the adsorption process identifies either physical adsorption, in which the van der Waals molecular interaction force predominates, or chemisorption, where chemical reaction forces provide the predominant intermolecular bonds. Thus, if in the process of adsorption the individuality of the adsorbed molecule (adsorbate) and of the solid surface (adsorbent) is preserved, we have physical adsorption. If a chemical reaction occurs and the nature of the adsorbate or the adsorbent is altered through a valence electron exchange representing chemical bonds, then we have chemisorption.


Both physical adsorption and chemical adsorption are exothermic reactions and both liberate heat during the adsorption phase. The heat of physical adsorption, with its somewhat weak physical bonds, is of the same order of magnitude as the heat of liquefaction. The heat of chemisorption, possessing stronger bonding forces, is in the same order of magnitude as its associated chemical reaction. Regeneration therefore requires a corresponding equivalent amount of energy to free the gas molecule from the solid-gas bonding force. The strong bonding forces characterized in chemisorption make this particular method undesirable for use in regenerative applications because of the excessive amount of energy required for desorption. However, regeneration of adsorbents possessing predominately physical bonds can be accomplished quite easily utilizing heat energy available in steam, hot gas, or electricity.

The solid-gas interface may also be broken by lowering the vapor pressure above the adsorbent, providing the liquefied gas molecule that is attached to the solid surface a sufficient amount of energy to break the weak van der Waals forces and again move into the gaseous state.


Although it is probable that all solids adsorb gases to some extent, adsorption as a rule is not very pronounced unless an adsorbent possess a large surface area for a given mass. For this reason such adsorbents as charcoals, activated alumina, silica gel, and molecular sieves are particularly effective as adsorbing agents, These substances have a very porous structure and with their large exposed surfaces can take up appreciable volumes of various gases. The first three of these adsorbents are amorphous in nature with a non-uniform internal structure. Molecular sieves, however, are crystalline and possess an internal structure of regularly spaced cavities with interconnecting pores of a definite size.


Dry Activated Carbon Adsorption


Adsorption is a process wherein molecules of a fluid or gas contact and adhere to the surface of a solid. This phenomenon is believed to occur generally in nature, regardless of the particular solids and gases involved. The forces present in this intermolecular activity have been identified as being of two major types: van der Waals forces and chemical or ionic forces. The bonding force playing the major role in the adsorption process identifies either physical adsorption, in which the van der Waals molecular interaction force predominates, or chemisorption, where chemical reaction forces provide the predominant intermolecular bonds. Thus, if in the process of adsorption the individuality of the adsorbed molecule (adsorbate) and of the solid surface (adsorbent) is preserved, we have physical adsorption. If a chemical reaction occurs and the nature of the adsorbate or the adsorbent is altered through a valence electron exchange representing chemical bonds, then we have chemisorption.


Both physical adsorption and chemical adsorption are exothermic reactions and both liberate heat during the adsorption phase. The heat of physical adsorption, with its somewhat weak physical bonds, is of the same order of magnitude as the heat of liquefaction. The heat of chemisorption, possessing stronger bonding forces, is in the same order of magnitude as its associated chemical reaction. Regeneration therefore requires a corresponding equivalent amount of energy to free the gas molecule from the solid-gas bonding force. The strong bonding forces characterized in chemisorption make this particular method undesirable for use in regenerative applications because of the excessive amount of energy required for desorption. However, regeneration of adsorbents possessing predominately physical bonds can be accomplished quite easily utilizing heat energy available in steam, hot gas, or electricity.

Dry Activated Carbon Adsorption


Adsorption is a process wherein molecules of a fluid or gas contact and adhere to the surface of a solid. This phenomenon is believed to occur generally in nature, regardless of the particular solids and gases involved. The forces present in this intermolecular activity have been identified as being of two major types: van der Waals forces and chemical or ionic forces. The bonding force playing the major role in the adsorption process identifies either physical adsorption, in which the van der Waals molecular interaction force predominates, or chemisorption, where chemical reaction forces provide the predominant intermolecular bonds. Thus, if in the process of adsorption the individuality of the adsorbed molecule (adsorbate) and of the solid surface (adsorbent) is preserved, we have physical adsorption. If a chemical reaction occurs and the nature of the adsorbate or the adsorbent is altered through a valence electron exchange representing chemical bonds, then we have chemisorption.


Both physical adsorption and chemical adsorption are exothermic reactions and both liberate heat during the adsorption phase. The heat of physical adsorption, with its somewhat weak physical bonds, is of the same order of magnitude as the heat of liquefaction. The heat of chemisorption, possessing stronger bonding forces, is in the same order of magnitude as its associated chemical reaction. Regeneration therefore requires a corresponding equivalent amount of energy to free the gas molecule from the solid-gas bonding force. The strong bonding forces characterized in chemisorption make this particular method undesirable for use in regenerative applications because of the excessive amount of energy required for desorption. However, regeneration of adsorbents possessing predominately physical bonds can be accomplished quite easily utilizing heat energy available in steam, hot gas, or electricity.

If you have a requirement and are looking for a scrubber system, fans or ductwork, do give us a call or send an email to us. If possible give a brief description of your requirement and see if we can be of help or service to you.